UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler
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System Number: 05383
Date: [1/15 May 1889][1]
Author: John Singer Sargent[2]
Place: London
Recipient: JW
Place: [London]
Repository: Glasgow University Library
Call Number: MS Whistler S27
Document Type: ALS


Wednesday

33, TITE STREET,
CHELSEA. S. W.

My dear Whistler

Many thanks for your kind note[3].

The sculptor Carriès[4] (65 Bd Arago) asked me to bring you the pottery as a témoignage[5] [p. 2] of his admiration. It is a specimen of grès[6], that he is experimenting in with a view to using it on a larger scale in sculpture. He thinks of having an exhibition here one of these days.

They are all clamouring for [p. 3] you in Paris. Shan't we see you there soon?

Yours sincerely

John S. Sargent


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Notes:

1.  [1/15 May 1889]
The letter has a deep mourning border, and must date from shortly after the death of Sargent's father on 25 April 1889. It probably dates from May, when Sargent was in Paris, serving on the Salon Jury with Monet, and when both he and JW gained medals at Universal Exhibition, Paris, 1889. Sargent exhibited six paintings in the American section and was awarded the grand prix and was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur.

2.  John Singer Sargent
John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), artist [more].

3.  note
Not located.

4.  Carriès
Jean Carriès (1855-1894), sculptor and potter [more]. A second letter from Sargent (#05384) makes it clear that Carriès was sending JW a jug.

5.  témoignage
Fr., testimonial.

6.  grès
Fr., stoneware. Carriès was greatly influenced by Japanese ceramics, and was experimenting with clays. He produced brutally expressive and surreal 'grotesque' ceramics that shocked critics.