UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler
Home > On-line Edition > Transcription/Database Record

the on-line edition

System Number: 04084
Date: [21 February 1885][1]
Author: Clementine Mitford[2]
Place: [London]
Recipient: JW
Place: [London]
Repository: Glasgow University Library
Call Number: MS Whistler M354
Document Type: ALS


Sat. Feb. 20th 1885 -

Dear Mr Whistler

I must write you a line - to say how very very[3] much delighted and disappointed I am - delighted to hear from Bertie[4] of the success of last night[5] and more than disappointed [p. 2] at not being present at "the most brilliant thing" Bertie had ever heard - I am so much pleased - but is there no means of my knowing exactly what you said? Will it be printed or will the lecture ever be re-[p. 3]peated?

this is a very untidy scrap but I cannot wait till I am allowed a pen and ink -

Mrs Flower[6] came this afternoon but unfortunately while I was asleep and [p. 4] she would have told me a great deal about it - and I want to hear from every body what can be told me -

Do come some day the week after next and tell me a great deal about it -

Yours very Sincerely

Clementine Mitford.


This document is protected by copyright.


Notes:

1.  [21 February 1885]
Dated from the reference to 'last night'. The lecture (see note below) was given on the evening of Friday, 20 February.

2.  Clementine Mitford
Clementine Gertrude Helen Mitford (1854-1932), née Ogilvy, wife of the 1st Baron Redesdale [more].

3.  very very
Double underlined.

4.  Bertie
Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford (1837-1916), Lord Redesdale (1886), diplomat, Secretary of the Office of Works, and collector [more].

5.  last night
A reference to JW's 'Ten O'Clock Lecture,' his major public statement of his aesthetic ideas. He delivered the lecture for the first time on 20 February 1885 at the Prince's Hall, Piccadilly. He repeated it a few weeks later at Cambridge on 24 March and Oxford on 30 April. A version of the text of the lecture may be found at #06791.

6.  Mrs Flower
Elizabeth H. Flower (b. ca 1843), artist [more].