UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler

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Documents associated with: 2nd Exhibition, Pictures, Drawings, Prints and Sculptures, International Society of Sculptors, Painters and Gravers, London, 1899
Record 22 of 54

System Number: 09990
Date: [1/4 May 1899][1]
Author: JW
Place: [Paris]
Recipient: John Lavery[2]
Place: [London]
Repository: Tate Gallery Archives
Call Number: Lavery Collection, TGA 7245/297
Document Type: ALS[3]


Private

My dear Lavery -

I hope you like my letter to the Council -

and that it exactly meets your wishes -

Dont let any [illegible ] press people in on the Varnishing [p. 2] day -

Have you got the "Etude de la Semaine" - by my Massière[4]?

and how do you like it -

Write me line about things -

If I can I may run over on Saturday but must[5] be back by Mondays boat - So say nothing about this

[butterfly signature]


This document is protected by copyright.


Notes:

1.  1/4 May 1899
The letter dates from shortly before the opening of the 2nd Exhibition, Pictures, Drawings, Prints and Sculptures, International Society of Sculptors, Painters and Gravers, London, 1899, on 7 May.

2.  John Lavery
John Lavery (1856-1941), painter [more].

3.  ALS
The paper has a deep mourning border.

4.  'Etude de la Semaine' - by my Massière
A work by Inez Eleanor Addams (fl. 1898-1927), née Bate, painter [more], who was JW's studio monitor (massière) at the Académie Carmen in Paris (see Pennell, Elizabeth Robins, and Joseph Pennell, The Life of James McNeill Whistler, 2 vols, London and Philadelphia, 1908, vol. 2, p. 224). It has been suggested that the title was chosen to diminish the importance of the work, and that JW did not really wish Inez Bate to be successful in her own right, but merely to be helpful and run errands (see Robyn Asleson, essay, in Merrill, Linda (ed.), After Whistler : The Artist and His Influence on American Painting, New Haven, 2003). However, JW's letters suggest that he was indeed interested in promoting her work. By contrast, her husband, Clifford Addams, eventually stopped Inez from continuing her artistic career and made her destroy most of her work (Addams family records).

5.  must
Double underlined.